Symposium 23. Unmeasured Consequences of Major Natural Disasters and Conflict

Room: Polaris A

Moderator: Frederick M. Burkle, Jr., MD, MPH, DTM, Senior Fellow & Scientist, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, Harvard University; Senior International Public Policy Scholar,Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Discussants:

  1. Richard Garfield, RN, MS, MPH, DrPH., Clinical Professor, Schools of Nursing & Mailman School of Public Health Public Health, Columbia University: Defining Neglected Indirect Consequences of Disasters and Conflict
  2. Leslie Roberts, PhD., Associate Clinical Professor of Population & Family Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York: Case example from the Conflict in the Congo
  3. David Abramson, PhD, MPH. Deputy Director & Director of Research, The National Center for Disaster Preparedness. Assistant professor of Clinical Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University: Case study from the Haitian Earthquake & Hurricane Katrina
  4. Erik R. Svendsen, PhD MS, Associate Professor, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Department of Global Environmental Health Sciences:Secondary Surge in a Domestic Disaster

It is common in the study of large-scale natural disasters and war to focus only on response to the direct consequences of the event. While direct consequences such as reported deaths and severe injuries easily captivate the public's attention, in the majority of major crises more people die and suffer long-term from indirect and preventable outcomes and yet only recently have they become the subject of study and research. This session will discuss findings from recent wars and major natural disasters and open discussion on what is required to better understand and mitigate these preventable outcomes in the future

  • Defining Neglected Indirect Consequences of Disasters and Conflict.
  • Case example from the Conflict in the Congo.
  • Case study from the Haitian Earthquake & Hurricane Katrina.